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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
are joined from the weather team with more on the science of all this. what is causing a storm of this magnitude? >> ape ve very rare case that t hurricane made landfall in new jersey. it is hurricane season so we do see a lot of storms this time of the year. usually we do not have a high-pressure system over the atlantic, called the blocking anti-cyclone, pretty self-explanatory from that name. but, you said this high-pressure system acts like a block. it is locked out of this system to move into the northeasterly path which usually -- the storms take place, take paths in that direction. but due to this high pressure sitting over here, for a while, it is very strong. cushions it, toward the eastern seaboards, of the united states. and this time -- it did make a landfall in the eastern coast. hence, the biggest storm in generations. now it has the become a remnant of low-pressure systems, so, it is much weaker than, than it was when it hit a landfall. though the tropical moisture brings all the humidity and turns and makes a lot of downpour as cross ts across the. you can see t
of science. before the long ascrention and specially designed capsule, his body had been fitted with a multitude of sensors to record his heart rate, blood pressure and other vital life signs to monitor how the human body copes with sustained free fall and acceleration and deceleration. >> keep your head down. >> to stop his blood boiling, his lungs exploding and his body disinterest at the grating he washese a pressurized suit and the whole thing is funded by a soft drink manufacturer. >> start the cameras. and i've got an angel to take care of you. >> felix baumgartner, why did you want to do this? >> well, you know, i have been -- i always have been a very competitive person, since i was 16 years old i started skydiving and i always wanted to push the limits. that's the reason why i was working on this so hard. >> but it's not like competing at tennis or at pool or a running race. to put yourself on the edge of space miles and miles up, i mean, that's completely different. >> it is, but that's what makes it so unique and challenging, because if you look at my backgrounds as a
of "advances in science and technology.". and representative todd akin's infamous remark about women's bodies shutting down to prevent pregnancy in cases of so-called "legitimate rape." >> so doctor, are these extreme remarks by republicans distancing themselves from these remarks, are they what are keeping abortion front and center? >> they are actions. they remind women of people trying to redefine rain rape. the words are bad enough. the actions are worse. >> i disagree, bonnie. i think it's to the less advantaged to keep this conversation going. most of them are concerned about the state of the economy and jobs and that's what they are going to the whole thinking about. >> what we know is abortion is the leading topic for women. 39% to 19% to the economy. with the electorate being 56% women, swing voters being a key women demographic, the candidates and the campaigns need to address the issue and have to be in front of it. that's why they are trying to make it an issue. >> i laugh because murdoch's comment along with todd akin, it's men bation the dumb remarks and not representative of th
industrial revolution in which the application of science utterly transforms the way we do almost everything. one of the latest transformative technologies is 3-d printing. it sounds absurd, it sounds impossible, but it promises to refashion whole arias of design. -- whole areas of design. >> due to the crafted objects made with care and great precision, they haven't been scrupted, or machine pressed. a different process has been employed. this is 3-d presenting. -- printing. >> at the design studio in london they can not only conceive products, they can make them, thanks to a technology that is falling in price and so becoming more accessible. it allows you to make just about anything. i'm being scanned with software, then building a precise template of my face. that will then be used to print out a 3-d me. so i've been scanned. what's next in the process? >> we prepare it into a print-ready file and we take you over here to this machine. >> you don't have to send it off to a factory somewhere? >> no, right here. it's an office-friendly machine that sits in a corner. and this will print you
code word for climate science for it stop funding climate science. romney himself says there is no scientific consensus so we should support more debate and investigation within the scientific community, except no action but to make problems worse. what about democrats? they conceded there is a problem and advocate that we work toward a problem -- program to set limits with other emerging powers. but that's it. no action. in fact, obama has emphasized, we have to work hard to gain when because 100 years of energy independence by exploiting domestic or canadian resources by fracking and other elaborate technologies. it does not ask what the world would look like in 100 years. so there are differences. the differences are, basically, about how enthusiastically the lemmings' should march toward the cliff. [laughter] the second major issue, nuclear war. it is also on the front pages daily. but in a way that was seem outlandish to some independent and fervoobserver. it does seem outrageous to many around the world. the current threat, not for the first time, is in the middle
powerful. just two weeks ago, the proceedings of the national academy of sciences published a major study on the connection between warmer sea surface temperatures and increase in stronger atlantic hurricanes. but the report said -- we begin today's show with two guests. it with me in oregon we're joined by greg jones, a climate scientist and professor of informal studies at southern oregon university in ashland. and joining us by videostream is bill mckibben, co-founder and director of 350.org. he is author of numerous books including, "eaarth: making a life on a tough new planet." on november 7, 350.org is launching a 20-city nationwide tour called "to the map" to connect the dots between extreme weather, climate change, and the fossil fuel industry. we welcome you both to "democracy now!" let's start with bill mckibben. you just made it back to your home in vermont. can you talk about the significance of what the east coast is facing right now. >> i think the first thing is this is a storm of really historic proportion. it is like something we have not seen before. it is half the size
the art and science of prediction and the signal and the noise, by so many predictions, why so many predictions fail and some don't i am pleased to have nate silver back at this table, welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> so where do you based on your polling, see the presidential race at this moment? >> we have obama as a modest favorite still and i should say it is not my polling what we go is look at everyone easels pol y ahead of bush, john kerry was ahead of gore, so polls in the spring and summer aren't very useful and you might look at what kind of economic conditions are like and things like that instead but we are only a week away from the election now, and it is unlikely you will have major shifts in the campaign from this point forward, by a week from now that little margin of error will be even less but we can use history, it is not that challenging to do at this point to say, most voters are locked in and you might have in who high owe some polls have three or four percent of voters who are still undecided and some of these polls by the way obama is at 50 percent which me
. christian science monitor once a week, "detroit news", cleveland plain, but "newsweek" saying we're just going to do it on-line that is happening it in the print world. not just in newspapers and magazines but obviously books, which is one of the questions why at some point there is at least the question mark where they will be able to continue publishing bound books. >> well, kind of come back though to socially what role books play. you know, sort of this cultural significance of the quote literary author, it really matters to a relatively small number of people. you know it's an elitist thing. there is popular fiction. there is serious nonfiction. you know, which is really in the same category as serious reporting of all kinds. >> you used this phrase elitist twice in this conversation watch. dow mean by that? >> what i mean is the notion by some group that their favorite activity is so important that it needs to be protected. >> what if it were defined differently as a group that says this is part of what you talked about earlier, of preserving the culture. >> i would say that the cu
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)